Should I take ibuprofen (e.g. Advil®) or acetaminophen (e.g. Tylenol®) for side effects from the COVID-19 vaccine or will it change the effectiveness of the vaccine? If I took medications beforehand do I need to get the vaccine again or have antibody test

Should I take ibuprofen (e.g. Advil®) or acetaminophen (e.g. Tylenol®) for side effects from the COVID-19 vaccine or will it change the effectiveness of the vaccine? If I took medications beforehand do I need to get the vaccine again or have antibody test

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The question is:

Should I take ibuprofen (e.g. Advil®) or acetaminophen (e.g. Tylenol®) for COVID-19 vaccination side effects, or will it affect the vaccine’s effectiveness? Do I need to get the vaccine again or have antibody testing to make sure it worked if I took drugs before?

The answer is:

Adults should not use pain relievers or fever reducers before receiving most immunizations, including COVID-19 vaccines. Medicines containing acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) should not be taken before to or during the immunization visit. Adults can use these drugs if they have a fever or pain after getting the immunization. Please read the BCCDC vaccine aftercare sheet and the HealthLinkBC file. If you require medication guidance, contact your health care provider.

If you consumed ibuprofen or acetaminophen before your COVID-19 vaccine appointment, you should keep the appointment and obtain your COVID-19 vaccine as scheduled. You may have heard that taking Advil or Tylenol before your COVID-19 immunization is not a good idea. This information comes from studies of children who received different shots rather than people who received COVID-19 vaccines. We don’t know if this is true for adults who have received the COVID-19 vaccine. Further research, including COVID-19 vaccinations, is needed to see how an adult’s immune system generates antibodies to any vaccine after taking these medicines. If you used pain relievers or anti-fever medications before getting the COVID-19 vaccine, you should still get it; the dose is still good, and you don’t need to get it again. Please note that acetaminophen (Tylenol®) should be used instead of ibuprofen (Advil®) by pregnant women who are experiencing discomfort or a fever.


Thoughts from people in BC

The second vaccine is now complete. Isn’t it fine if you become a little emotional?

😉

On June 6, 2021, Randy Stone (@RandyStoneCotW) tweeted:

(ImmunizeBC does not recommend the above-mentioned account.)