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Time & Date The date is Thursday, February 4, 2021 Joe Feist is the author of this piece If you had a sore arm and possibly a fever after receiving your second dosage of either the Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccination, congratulations. “That’s usually a good sign,” said Fred Campbell, MD, an internal medicine specialist at UT Health San Antonio and an assistant professor of medicine. “In general, a good local reaction is compatible with the body’s defense against that specific vaccine, which is antibody development.” He soon noted, though, that everyone is different. “Just because you don’t have a hurting arm doesn’t mean the vaccination isn’t working; it just means that if you do, you’re probably getting a good response.” Minor symptoms can appear immediately after the shot or within a few minutes or hours, and can linger for a day or so, according to Dr. Campbell, “but almost…

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Thank you for your interest in helping patients! The American Red Cross has updated its collection of lifesaving blood products to accommodate the requirements of all patients, including those fighting COVID-19, throughout the pandemic. The Red Cross and its industry partners have been able to create a adequate supply of convalescent plasma to satisfy the projected needs of COVID-19 patients because to the generosity of tens of thousands of convalescent plasma donors and the drop in hospital demand. As a result, the Red Cross no longer accepts convalescent plasma contributions and no longer converts plasma from routine blood donations that test positive for high levels of antibodies into convalescent plasma We will, however, continue to provide this potentially life-saving medicine to hospitals as needed. We urge all those interested in helping to save lives to Please consider donating blood or platelets. Your contributions will benefit patients undergoing cancer treatment, organ…

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Rehabilitation is quickly becoming a top priority in addressing the pandemic’s effects, and it’s critical for persons recovering from COVID-19 infection. We’ve created three resources to help patients cope with post-viral tiredness and save energy while recovering from COVID-19. The Critical Care Society has endorsed these guidelines. These guidelines are available in PDF format, which you may download and share with others who are recovering from COVID-19. How to manage post-viral fatigue after COVID-19 Our post-viral tiredness recommendations are for both hospitalized patients and those who have recovered at home. They are chock-full of practical suggestions to help people gradually and securely resume their everyday routines. Check the handbook for further information**‘Practical advise for persons who have been hospitalized.’** Check the handbook for further information**‘Advice for persons who have recovered at home.’** What you can do to save electricity The 3 Ps method (Pace, Plan, Prioritize) is used in our…

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Self-isolate Please adhere to all government regulations. Remember to isolate yourself from your family/household as much as possible, even if they have symptoms or are self-isolating as well. If your condition worsens, get medical care as soon as possible, according to federal guidelines. Take a break Rest is That is crucial for your body’s defense against infection. Both your body and mind require relaxation. Limit your exposure to television, phones, and social media. Relaxation, breathing and meditation can all support quality rest – the NHS Apps Library has free tools you can try. Sensory relaxation tools such as fragrances, blankets, and relaxing music can also help. If one method fails to work for you, switch to another until you find one that does. It’s time to sleep You may discover that you require more sleep. Make sure you have a good night’s sleep by making your room as dark as possible, sticking to a…

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According to a study published Tuesday in the Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, a huge percentage of Covid-19 patients who were never sick enough to be hospitalized have ongoing, and in some cases debilitating, thinking issues. The study is based on an examination of 100 Covid-19 "long-hauler" patients with symptoms that have persisted at least six weeks, according to Northwestern Medicine in Chicago. All of them had a minor ailment at first: a sore throat, a cough, and a low-grade temperature. Full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak Yet, once the acute illness subsided, 85 percent of those surveyed reported at least four long-term neurological issues that had impacted their everyday lives. "Brain fog" was by far the most commonly reported symptom, with 81 percent of responders having continuous memory and thinking problems. Sixty-eight percent had headaches, and more than half reported loss of taste and smell, numbness or tingling,…

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As the number of COVID-19 illnesses rises, more individuals are questioning how they’ll know whether they’ve been infected with the novel coronavirus. >> Read more trending news While quick testing is available in some places, most people wait until symptoms appear before seeing a doctor for a COVID-19 test. What symptoms will you experience if you think you’ve been infected with the virus, and when will they appear? Here’s what we currently know: When will you start to notice signs and symptoms? COVID-19 has a five-day incubation period, which is the time between when you become infected with a virus and when you start to show symptoms. According to WebMD, most persons who are exposed to the virus will develop symptoms five to twelve days later. Are you fine if you haven’t displayed any signs of the infection by Day 12? The majority of persons who will develop symptoms will…

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Physical therapy for your nose may be able to assist you in regaining your senses. HOUSTON — As the COVID-19 pandemic enters its second year, the National Institutes of Health is concentrating on the virus’s long-term impacts. Sleep disturbances, mental fog, fevers, and sadness are all possible symptoms. Congress approved $1.15 billion in December for a four-year study of COVID-19’s health effects. Doctors want to determine if catching the virus raises the likelihood of developing persistent heart or brain problems. The loss of taste and smell is one of the persistent symptoms that specialists are investigating. Baylor College of Medicine doctors are compiling data from patients they see in Houston. Even after they recover, one-third of patients, according to Dr. Sunthosh Sivam, describe being unable to taste or smell. According to several studies, younger patients and women are more likely to be affected. Sivam is an otolaryngologist who has dealt…

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Please complete our survey if you have recovered from COVID-19 and would like to help others by giving plasma. We want to expand the donation program in the future, but for now, we can only take donations from people who are eligible. Call 346.238.4360 between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. if you prefer to speak with someone directly. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Criteria are a set of rules that must be followed We’re looking for anyone between the ages of 18 and 65 who are willing to donate blood. People must upload an image or document to this form as verification of a positive molecular COVID-19 test. Donors who have specific underlying medical issues, are elderly, or weigh less than 110 lbs (50 kg) are not eligible. Learn more about who is eligible to donate blood. More information Plasma donation is comparable to blood donation in…

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Those with autism spectrum disorder will find it easier to attend the dentist Among African Americans, smoking more than doubles the risk of heart disease How can you cope with anxiety while pregnant? Are you taking any weight-loss or sports-related supplements? Take precautions You’re not quite ready for cataract surgery yet? Take a look at these suggestions Psychedelic substances in psychiatry in the future Have you vaccinated your children against COVID-19 yet? What should I do? Might new kinds of PrEP help with soaring HIV rates? Take care! Health news that is frightening can be hazardous to your health Weight loss after a pandemic: There’s an app for that

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